The Transconceive Project Blog

Looking Past Gender Roles in Classical Literature

Rhyming Mother Wilma

Now that Patty Pan is out and available, I’ve started working on my next transconceived edition, Alan’s Adventures in Wonderland based on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. This has been one of my favorite books ever since I was a child, and it continues to amaze and impress me every time I dip into it.

One of the interesting challenges is the amount of intricate word play, and in particular the original poetry. I want to do it justice, but it’s sometimes a little tricky.

For example, I’m working on transconceiving “You are Old Father William” into “You are Old Mother Wilma.” Here’s one of the stanzas I’m converting:

‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak 
Pray how did you manage to do it?’
‘In my youth,’ said his father, ‘I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.’

What I came up with was this:

‘You are old,’ said the youth, ‘and your jaws are too weak
For anything tougher than suet;
Yet you finished the gander, with bones and with beak 
Pray how did you manage to do it?’
‘In my youth,’ said her mother, ‘I took to the law,
And argued each case with my man;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my span.’

I think it’s vital that the lines still scan rhythmically, and that the meaning remain true to the original. I’m curious if you think I’m getting the right mood with my changes.

Patty Pan and Walter Released

Patty Pan and Walter Released

It’s been exciting getting feedback about A Christmas Carol, and now I’m looking forward to hearing what people think about Patty Pan and Walter, a transconceived edition of Peter and Wendy by J. M. Barrie.

I decided to tackle this book because it has had such a strong cultural impact. The image of Peter Pan’s eternal childhood as an irresponsible little boy is so clearly contrasted with the youthful responsibility and sense of order that Wendy brings. It’s what’s expected of them because of their genders.

See how the story adapts, as a responsible young boy takes care of a tribe of unruly young girls as they fight pirates, fly with faeries, and learn the importance of having a nurturing father figure in their lives. It’s so much fun enjoying the intricate little twists and tangles in the writing, and it works well regardless of the genders of the characters.

Please let me know what you think of Patty Pan and Walter!–

Finalizing Patty Pan for Release

Patty Pan Breaks Through

I’ve been having such a marvelous time exploring the fiction of J. M. Barrie without the gender bias from the original “Peter and Wendy” to slow me down. Every time I dig into another chapter, I find some way that the transconceived version of this book delights me and heightens the enchantment.

One of the original art panels from the book as it was published in 1911 shows Peter Pan standing out on a rock, waiting to die, with the caption: “To die will be an awfully big adventure?”

Peter Pan - To die will be an awfully big
adventure?

Since Peter is portrayed in an almost gender-neutral way in this image, it’s very easy to read the transconceived text that accompanies the original illustration, and see Patty Pan standing there:

Patty was not quite like other girls; but she was afraid at last. A tremour ran through her, like a shudder passing over the sea; but on the sea one shudder follows another till there are hundreds of them, and Patty felt just the one. Next moment she was standing erect on the rock again, with that smile on her face and a drum beating within her. It was saying, “To die will be an awfully big adventure.”

I’m planning to release the book and the ebook together on December 26, but I’ve made the ebook available for pre-order. I hope everyone enjoys this one! Be sure to let me know what you think.

A Gift for the Holidays

A Personal Gift

For the holidays this year, I wanted everyone who’s curious to be able to download and read “A Christmas Carol Transconceived” as a personal gift from me.

If you find it interesting, I encourage you to discuss it with your friends and family, and share it with anyone you think might enjoy it. Leave feedback with your honest impressions on the sites where you prefer to find, review, and discuss books with your fellow readers. And please let me know where to find your comments, so I can benefit from your insights and participate in the discussion.

Either way, please enjoy the book, and enjoy the season!